Ports Australia

We are Australia’s ports.

Working together, ports lead the way in advancing the nation’s prosperity, managing safety and safeguarding the environment.

We move $1.2 billion of cargo every day, delivering essential goods to and from all over the world.

  • The device in
    your hand
  • the car
    you drive
  • your
    computer
  • and even
    your coffee.

Proudly brought to you by Australia’s ports.

  • The device in
    your hand
  • the car
    you drive
  • your
    computer
  • and even
    your coffee.

Proudly brought to you by Australia’s ports.

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What

Australia’s ports are our maritime gateways and service the fifth largest shipping task of any nation in the world.

Since 1916, we have worked together to effectively and safely grow our economy and sustain our communities.

Ports are also at the forefront of supporting national defence and tourism.

Ports support our growing population

Australia’s population has grown almost five-fold over the past 100 years – from 4.9 million people in 1916 to more than 24 million in 2016.

The volume of Australia's trade is 70 times greater than it was in 1916.

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Australian population (millions)
Volume of trade (in $A billions)
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2036

Ports and trade

On any given day, $1.2 billion of trade moves through Australia’s ports. This equates to one-third of our national wealth each year.

Ports are Australia’s largest cargo centres moving 3.6 million tonnes of goods and raw materials each day. That’s more than 68 times the weight of the Sydney Harbour Bridge!

Australia’s key imports through ports

  • $18.71 billion
    Passenger motor vehicles
  • $11.04 billion
    Telecommunication equipment
  • $8.05 billion
    Computers
  • $7.08 billion
    Medicine
  • $6.12 billion
    Goods vehicles
  • $4.24 billion
    Heating and cooling equipment and parts

Australia’s key exports through ports

  • $54.46 billion
    Iron ore
  • $37.88 billion
    Coal
  • $16.90 billion
    Natural gas
  • $13.51 billion
    Gold
  • $9.04 billion
    Beef
  • $5.53 billion
    Wheat

Did you know?

More than half a million cars are delivered through Australia’s ports each year.

Did you know?

Australia produces 8 types of wheat. Australian Noodle wheat - delivered through Australia’s ports to Japan and Korea - is used in the production of premium udon and ramen noodles.

Ports and defence

Australia’s ports support our national defence and security. The busiest ports for navy ships are Darwin, Fremantle and Sydney.

Ports provide a vital lifeline during times of disaster and emergency, offering access when land routes are impassable.

calls made by navy ships at Australian ports in 2015

Ports and tourism

Australia is a sought-after destination for the world’s cruise ships. Over the past decade, cruise tourism through Australia’s ports has grown by more than 10% each year.

876
cruise ships visited Australia’s ports in 2014/15
$900m
spent by visitors during their stay
Read more about how ports advance Australia through international trade, national defence and tourism.

Where

Australia has more than 70 ports that support trade with every region of the world.

Australia’s ports

Click on the map to find out more about your local port.

Find your nearest port
Enter your postcode to find your nearest port.

Australia’s top 5 sea trade partners

Ports connect Australia’s valuable exports with the world, enhancing our economy to the value of $250 billion each year.

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Australia’s imports and exports by state

Click on the map to compare each Australian state.

All states

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  • Exports

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Who

Ports offer unique and diverse employment opportunities.

We operate at the leading edge of opportunities.

With the volume of sea trade expected to double in the next 20 years, Australia’s ports are employers of the future.

Australia’s ports employ more than

33,700

We are Australia’s ports.

Watch our video below.

When

It is 100 years since Australia’s harbour authorities met in Melbourne for the first interstate conference on 31 October 1916. This was the start of “an interchange of opinion between the several Australian port authorities which might be of mutual help to each other”.

Today, Ports Australia stands proudly as the organisation representing Australia’s government and privately-owned ports. Working together, we are leading the way in advancing Australia’s prosperity, managing port safety and safeguarding the environment.

Today, Ports Australia stands proudly as the organisation representing Australia’s government and privately-owned ports. Working together, we are leading the way in advancing Australia’s prosperity, managing port safety and safeguarding the environment.

Ports in pictures

Why

Australia’s population is expected to reach 28 million by 2030.

We need ports to support this growth.

More than 90% of world trade is carried by sea.

Shipping is the most sustainable and cost-effective method of transport to move raw materials and mass goods around the world.


More than 90% of world trade is carried by sea.

Shipping is the most sustainable and cost-effective method of transport to move raw materials and mass goods around the world.

Helping our communities

Australia’s ports are a vital part of our communities – from coastal towns to the most isolated regions of Australia.

Each year, Australia’s ports spend more than $2.2 million supporting communities through hosting educational tours, improving local facilities, protecting the environment, sponsoring events and taking part in industry partnerships.

  • Master Planning

    Port of Brisbane, QLD

    Port of Brisbane is currently working with the University of Queensland on a $2 million research collaboration to develop solutions to increase port capacity.

  • Health

    Port of Brisbane, QLD

    After extreme flooding in 2013, more than 2 million tonnes of sediment was deposited in the Port of Brisbane’s navigational channel. Extensive dredging was required to safely re-open the channel.

  • Community

    Ports North, QLD

    The Cairns Indigenous Art Fair is a landmark event and both a platform for cultural exchange and an economic opportunity for Queensland Indigenous artists.

  • Community

    Port of Newcastle, NSW

    Port of Newcastle has a long history of supporting surf lifesaving clubs, in recognition of the invaluable work they do keeping local beaches safe.

Advancing sustainably

Australia’s ports are committed to understanding and managing the impact of our operations on land and at sea.

We believe that leading environmental stewardship and sustainable port development go hand in hand. These values are the foundation of our approach to planning.

  • Environment

    Fremantle Ports, WA

    Fremantle Ports has been providing funding support for dolphin research programs for more than six years and in-kind support for about 15 years.

  • Environment

    Port of Port Hedland, WA

    Pilbara Ports Authority’s mangrove rehabilitation program demonstrates that environmental best practice and sustainable port development go hand in hand.

  • Environment

    Darwin Port, NT

    In 2012, Darwin Port and Charles Darwin University commenced a research project to monitor Eastern Curlew and other migratory birds.

  • Environment

    Port of Townsville, QLD

    The Queensland ports seagrass monitoring program is an example of ports safeguarding the environment.

Ports in the future

Australia’s ports also are preparing for the future which will bring bigger ships that can carry cargo more efficiently, using less fuel per tonne.

As vessels and trade increase, Australia’s shipping channels need to be developed and maintained.

1916 1966 2016

Master planning

To make sure we’re good neighbours, ports prepare master plans, in consultation with local communities and government, to help shape and share the vision for how we will operate and where we will operate – now and into the future.

Disclaimer and credits

Copyright © 2016 Ports Australia

Copyright © 2016 Ports Australia

Disclaimer:
While every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained on this website is accurate, Ports Australia gives no warranty regarding this information and accepts no liability for any inconvenience, or any direct or consequential loss, arising from reliance upon this information.

Readers should undertake their own enquiries in relation to any of the facts referred to, before acting upon them.

Content credit:
Thank you to all ports who contributed imagery and footage for use on this website.

Data sources:
Australian Bureau of Statistics
Australian Cruise Association
Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Design:
PRISM Communication Architects
Flip Creative

Web development & video production:
Flip Creative

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